Amietophrynus brauni

Amietophrynus brauni (Nieden, 1911)

Original Published Description:

Nieden, F. (1911).  Verziechnis der bei Amani in Deutschostafrika vorkommenden Reptilien und Amphibien. Sitzungsberichte der Gesellschaft Naturforschender Freunde zu Berlin. 1910, 441-452.

Common Names

Dead-leaf Toad (English), Braun's Toad (English)

Languages: English

Description

Size

Male snout-vent lengths range from 65 -70 mm and females 80 - 110 mm (Harper et al., 2010).

Author(s): Zimkus, Breda
Rights holder(s): Zimkus, Breda

Morphology

A large toad. The dorsum is warty and brown with darker brown patches. Some individuals have reddish tinges. A black band begins on the snout and passes above the eye, under the large parotid gland and along the side of the body. A single light line runs vertically from the eye to the mouth. The arms and legs are banded with darker brown. The tympanum is distinctly visible, greater than ½ the diameter of the eye and may be slightly oval in larger individuals. The first finger is longer than the second. Toes are webbed only slightly at the base (Text from Harper et al., 2010).

Author(s): Zimkus, Breda
Rights holder(s): Zimkus, Breda

Comparisons

The black band along the side of the head and body distinguish this species from most others in the genus. A. reesi also has the dark stripe, but has more extensive toe webbing than A. brauni. Schismaderma carens also has a dark stripe, but lacks parotid glands (Text from Harper et al., 2010).

Author(s): Zimkus, Breda
Rights holder(s): Zimkus, Breda

Ecology

Habitat and Ecology

This species is found within leaf litter in submontane and montane forest at elevations between 750 and 1800 m. It may be found in villages near forests (Harper et al., 2010).

Author(s): Zimkus, Breda
Rights holder(s): Zimkus, Breda

Life History

Reproduction

It breeds in streams where it lays long strings of thousands of small, darkly pigmented eggs directly into the water (Harper et al., 2010).

Author(s): Zimkus, Breda
Rights holder(s): Zimkus, Breda

Advertisement Call

The advertisement call is a single, long, deep note (Text from Harper et al., 2010). It was described by Channing and Howell (2006) as “a loud rattling snore” with 72 pulses per second.

Author(s): Zimkus, Breda
Rights holder(s): Zimkus, Breda

Taxonomy

  • Bufo brauni Nieden, 1911 (synonym)
  • Amietophrynus brauni — Frost, Grant, Faivovich, Bain, Haas, Haddad, de Sá, Channing, Wilkinson, Donnellan, Raxworthy, Campbell, Blotto, Moler, Drewes, Nussbaum, Lynch, Green, and Wheeler, 2006 (synonym)

References

Barbour, T., & Loveridge A. (1928).  A comparative study of the herpetological faunae of the Uluguru and Usambara Mountains, Tanganyika Territory with descriptions of new species. Memoirs of the Museum of Comparative Zoology. L(2), 85-265.
 
Harper, E. B., Measey G. J., Patrick D. A., Menegon M., & Vonesh J. R. (2010).  Field Guide to Amphibians of the Eastern Arc Mountains and Coastal Forests of Tanzania and Kenya. 320. Nairobi, Kenya: Camerapix Publishers International.
 
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