Amietia fuscigula

Amietia fuscigula (Duméril and Bibron, 1841)

Original Published Description:

Duméril, A. M. C., & Bibron G. (1841).  Erpétologie Genérale ou Histoire Naturelle Complète des Reptiles. Volume 8, Paris: Librarie Enclyclopedique de Roret.
 

Common Names

Dark-throated River Frog (English), Dusky-throated River Frog (English), Dark-throated Frog (English), Cape River Frog (English), Cape Rana (English), Brown-throated Frog (English)

Languages: English

Overview

Distribution

A. fuscigula is found in South Africa; there is an extralimital population occurring in the Naukluft Mountains in Namibia (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).

Author(s): Channing, A.
Rights holder(s): Channing, A.

Ecology

Habitat and Ecology

A. fuscigula inhabits mainly the Grassland and Fynbos biomes, but fragmented populations occur in the southwestern parts of the arid Succulent Karoo and Nama Karoo biomes. It occurs in both winter- and summer rainfall areas, where annual precipitation ranges from 200 mm in the Karoo to >3000 mm on the Cape fold mountains. A. fuscigula uses the same habitat throughout the year. It is associated with permanent springs, ponds and farm dams in the dry northwest, while elsewhere it occurs along most well-vegetated waterways (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).

Author(s): Channing, A.
Rights holder(s): Channing, A.

Associations

Amietia fuscigula tested positive for Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (chytrid fungus that causes the disease chytridiomycosis) in Stutterheim, South Africa in 2002 (Lane et al. 2003). The species also tested positive in Gharries in 1996, Port Elizabeth, Kammieskroon, Kammiesberg, Springbok and Goegap NR in 2004 (Weldon 2005).

Author(s): Bergmann, Travis
Rights holder(s): Bergmann, Travis

Rose (1962) and Channing (1979) describe that these frogs eat anything that comes within reach, mostly insects. Food records include a mouse, other frogs, including conspecific frogs, and crabs (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).

Author(s): Channing, A.
Rights holder(s): Channing, A.

Life History

Reproduction

Breeding takes place throughout the year, with a peak in the rainy season. Males often call from the surface of deep water, and can be heard calling during the day and night (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).

Author(s): Channing, A.
Rights holder(s): Channing, A.

Conservation

IUCN Red List Category and Justification of Conservation Status

This widespread species is not threatened and no special conservation measures are needed (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).

Author(s): Channing, A.
Rights holder(s): Channing, A.

Taxonomy

  • Rana fuscigula Duméril and Bibron, 1841 (synonym)
  • Rana quecketti Boulenger, 1895 "1894" (synonym)
  • Rana hymenopus Boulenger, 1920 (synonym)
  • Rana fuscigula fuscigula — Hewitt, 1927 (synonym)
  • Rana (Rana) fuscigula — Guibé, 1950 "1948" (synonym)
  • Strongylopus hymenopus — Van Dijk, 1966 (synonym)
  • Rana (Stronglylopus) hymenopus — Dubois, 1981 (synonym)
  • Rana (Afrana) fuscigula — Dubois, 1992 (synonym)
  • Afrana fuscigula — Visser and Channing, 1997 (synonym)
  • Amietia fuscigula — Frost, Grant, Faivovich, Bain, Haas, Haddad, de Sá, Channing, Wilkinson, Donnellan, Raxworthy, Campbell, Blotto, Moler, Drewes, Nussbaum, Lynch, Green, and Wheeler, 2006 (synonym)

References

Goodman, J. D. (1986).  Phrynobatrachotrema n. g. for Haplometroides eburnense (Trematoda: Omphalometridae) in African frogs and toads. Trans. Am. Microsc. Soc.. 105(3), 296-299.
Rose, W. (1962).  The Reptiles and Amphibians of Southern Africa. (Rev E., Ed.).