Amietia dracomontana

Amietia dracomontana (Channing, 1978)

Original Published Description:

Channing, A. (1978).  A new Rana from the Lesotho Plateau (Amphibia: Anura).. Annals of the Natal Museum. 23, 361-365.

Common Names

Drakensberg Frog (English), Sani Pass Frog (English), Drakensberg River Frog (English)

Languages: English

Overview

Distribution

A. dracomontana is endemic to the highlands of southern and eastern Lesotho (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).

Author(s): Channing, A.
Rights holder(s): Channing, A.

Ecology

Habitat and Ecology

Walton (1984) reported that A. dracomontana is found in montane grassland at altitudes above 2000 m in areas that usually experience snow in winter and where annual rainfall is >700 mm (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).

Author(s): Channing, A.
Rights holder(s): Channing, A.

Associations

Amietia dracomontana tested positive for Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (chytrid fungus that causes the disease chytridiomycosis) in Meiringskloof, Free State, South Africa in 2004 (Weldon, 2005). This species also tested positive for the fungus near the Katis Dam, Lesotho in 2004 (Weldon, 2005).

Author(s): Bergmann, Travis
Rights holder(s): Bergmann, Travis

Food items consist mostly of Hemiptera, Coleoptera and Orthoptera. Predators are unknown, although at lower altitudes otters are important predators of river frogs (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).

Author(s): Channing, A.
Rights holder(s): Channing, A.

Life History

Reproduction

Breeding takes place in shallow streams and along the edges of rivers with well-vegetated banks. These habitats are typically rocky with rounded basaltic stones forming the riverbed. The species uses the same habitat throughout the year, including the breeding season. Breeding takes place in summer from October to February (Channing 1978, 1979). Males call at or near the water’s edge (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).

Author(s): Channing, A.
Rights holder(s): Channing, A.

Conservation

IUCN Red List Category and Justification of Conservation Status

A. dracomontana is not threatened (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).

Author(s): Channing, A.
Rights holder(s): Channing, A.

Taxonomy

  • Rana dracomontana Channing, 1978 (synonym)
  • Rana (Rana) dracomontana — Dubois, 1987 "1986" (synonym)
  • Rana (Afrana) dracomontana — Dubois, 1992 (synonym)
  • Afrana dracomontana — Visser and Channing, 1997 (synonym)
  • Amietia dracomontana — Frost, Grant, Faivovich, Bain, Haas, Haddad, de Sá, Channing, Wilkinson, Donnellan, Raxworthy, Campbell, Blotto, Moler, Drewes, Nussbaum, Lynch, Green, and Wheeler, 2006 (synonym)

References

Channing, A. (1976).  Histories of frogs in the Namib Desert. Zoologica Africana . 299-312.
Channing, A. (1979).  Ecological and systematic relationships of Rana and Strongylopus in southern Natal. . Annals of the Natal Museum. 797-831.
ed. Walton, C. (1984).  Reader’s Digest Atlas of Southern Africa. Cape Town: Reader’s Digest Association,.
Weldon, C., Du Preez L. H., Hyatt A. D., & Speare R. (2004).  Origin of the amphibian chytrid fungus. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 10, 2100-2105.